Black History Month—February 2017

 
   

BLACK HISTORY MONTH @ THE ART MUSEUM—February 2017

Join us for our first Black History Month documentary film series and celebration! We are thrilled to be a part of a national dialogue that honors the lives of African Americans. Through this shared experience we invite you to examine notions of urbanism, class, economics, culture, race, identity, and how it all helps to shape American history.
 
 

February 26 (Sunday) @ 1 p.m.
Before They Die!

Before They Die! (92 mins) is a film chronicling the survivors of the Tulsa Race Riot and their quest for justice. The riot took place on May 31 and June 1, 1921. A white mob attacked residents and businesses of the African American community of Greenwood in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in what is widely considered the worst incident of racial violence in U.S. history. The attack, carried out on the ground and by air, destroyed more than thirty-five blocks. At the time, Greenwood was the wealthiest black community in the nation. 

More about the movie here

 
 

EARLIER PROGRAMS

February 2 (Thursday)
Black History Month fim series: 13th
5:30 p.m.

Tonight's film is 13th (100 mins), the title referring to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which reads “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States.” The progression from that second qualifying clause to the horrors of mass criminalization and the sprawling American prison industry is laid out by director Ava DuVernay with bracing lucidity. With a potent mixture of archival footage and testimony from a dazzling array of activists, politicians, historians, and formerly incarcerated women and men, DuVernay creates a work of grand historical synthesis.

Learn more about the movie here
 

 

February 5 (Sunday)
Black History Month talk: From where I stand, I see...
1 p.m.

Join us for a presentation by Dr. Wendy Wilson-Fall exploring themes of identity and culture as part of our Black History Month celebration. We are thrilled to be a part of a national dialogue that honors the lives of African Americans. Through this shared experience we invite you to examine notions of urbanism, class, economics, culture, race, identity, and how it all helped shape American history. Free admission

Wendy Wilson-Fall is an associate professor of Africana studies at Lafayette College, where she recently assumed the directorship of the Africana studies program. Previously Dr. Wilson-Fall served as chair of Pan-African studies at Kent State University, Ohio, and as director of the West African Research Center (in Dakar), where she served  from 1999 to 2004. Wilson-Fall works on themes of identity, culture, local histories, and social space. Research and publishing include both African Diaspora and continent-based projects.

Click here for a video of Dr. Wilson-Fall

 

 

February 12 (Sunday) and 23 (Thursday)

The Loving Story
Art Ways Interactive Family Gallery

The Loving Story (78 mins) documents the life of an interracial couple in the segregated south of 1958. A white man named Richard Loving and his part black, part Cherokee fiancée Mildred Jeter traveled to Washington, D.C., from Caroline County, Virginia, to be married. They returned home two weeks later only to be arrested, tried, and convicted of the felony crime of miscegenation. At the time, interracial marriage was illegal in Virginia and twenty-one states. The Lovings agreed to leave the state to avoid a one-year jail sentence; they could return to Virginia only separately. The film documents their fight to no longer live in exile but to return home with their children as husband and wife.

Read more about the movie here

 

 

Black History Month @ the Art Museum is part of the HeARThstone Project. HeARThstone is rooted in the belief that art can, and does, change lives, and that in collaboration with their communities art museums can be significant partners in the creation of safe neighborhoods.

The HeARThstone Project is supported by the generosity of the Harry C. Trexler Trust.